Do you or someone you know have an autoimmune disease?

Please check out my blog post at Natural Healy concepts. I’m so proud to be guest blogging for them. Let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear them.

 

http://blog.naturalhealthyconcepts.com/2017/12/15/autoimmune-disease/ 

Thanks for all the readership and support!

Merrit

Turmeric is a popular Middle Eastern spice and primary ingredient in curry. Turmeric is also prized for its medicinal properties. The key medicinal component in turmeric is a compound called curcumin. Curcumin provides a range of benefits thanks to its antioxidant properties. Curcumin in supplements is commonly found combined with black peppercorn as it aids in the body’s absorption of curcumin by about 2000%. Making turmeric a consistent part of your diet may provide several health benefits.

  1. Turmeric for a normal moodTurmeric has been used throughout history as a mood booster. During a small study of 60 patients, research showed that patients who took 1 gram of curcumin had a better mood than those that did not. The study also showed that curcumin has a similar effect to some products labeled to help address mood and behavior disorders. It has also been suggested that curcumin may boost brain neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine.
  2. Turmeric for cellular healthUncontrolled growth can result in several harmful conditions that affect the body in several ways. Some studies have investigated the use of curcumin as a compound that reduces angiogenesis, which is important for preventing the growth of blood vessels in tumors. Other studies have also looked into the use of curcumin to reduce cancer cell growth and tumors. Curcumin is an aid in digestive and colon health as well, and early studies suggest that it may have a similar supportive effect in the digestive system. Unfortunately none of these studies are conclusive and require further investigation.
  3. Turmeric for inflammation and joint comfortAlthough inflammation can be beneficial to our bodies, like fighting bad bacteria, it becomes a problem when it is chronic. Chronic inflammation has been suggested to be a common antagonist in many diseases such as cancer, heart disease, cognitive disorders, metabolic syndrome, and other various degenerative diseases. Curcumin’s effect on inflammation is said to match more traditional medicinal therapies. In one study, curcumin showed optimal results in patients involved in rheumatoid arthritis therapies.
  4. Turmeric for memory and learning Cognitive challenges can lead to a range of disorders that affect learning, memory, and much more. While treatment for many of these disorders has yet to be discovered, research is looking at methods to delay the onset of these disorders. Science has shown that inflammation and oxidative damage both play a role in the rate and severity of cognitive challenges. New studies have shown that curcumin may have beneficial effects on the mind during aging. For example, a component of the neurological condition Alzheimer’s is thought to be the result of a buildup of protein tangles. These tangles are called Amyloid plaques and curcumin has been shown to break down and clear these plaques.

As you can see, turmeric is much more than just a spice, and these four incredible benefits only scratch the surface of its potential. Turmeric has many medicinal uses and is a wonderful natural remedy to many ailments as well as a source of protection for your body’s health. A tasty and easy way to make curcumin part of your diet is to drink Golden Milk. Adding turmeric to your regular diet can result in a happier healthier you.

 

Welcome and thank you to Natural Healthy Concepts for their first guest blog post! Please visit them at: https://www.naturalhealthyconcepts.com/

Welcome Natural Healthy Concepts!

I’m excited to announce that Natural Healthy Concepts approached me recently to ask if I would be willing to swap guest blogs once a quarter. I welcome them as we are very aligned in our interests and focus and I believe a new perspective is always a good addition, so stay tuned for the first guest blog in then next few days!

Drop me a line and let me know what you think about the topics that will be covered in the guest blogs. I’d love to hear from you!

5 Ways to Address Your “SAD”-ness

Do you feel the pull of wintertime blues as the days are becoming shorter? This is a time of year where many can be affected by mood changes due to the changing of the seasons and lack of sunlight; some people suffer from a disorder called Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD. The tell tail symptoms of SAD include fatigue, depression, hopelessness, and social withdrawal. These are symptoms that typically show up at the same time each year and can begin in the fall and last through winter. SO, even if you have these symptoms to a small degree, yet you don’t have SAD, the ways in which you can ease and improve the symptoms are the same.

Here is a 5-pronged approach to address SAD or your depression during fall / winter months. Taking a comprehensive approach is more effective than only addressing this with one solution.

 

Diet –

This time of year brings lots of holiday celebration. You may be tempted to fill up on sugary items, candy, cookies, pastries, breads, chips and essentially non-nutrient value processed carbohydrate, which may have an initial affect of euphoria, but truth be told the resulting crash will actually make you feel worse than prior to eating these type of carbohydrates.

Filling your diet with real unprocessed foods will be an important part of reducing symptoms of sad. Real veggies, fruit, protein and healthy fats are where improvement will begin. Healthy fats are especially important for the brain and for neurotransmitters. Fats such as Avocados, Olives, olive oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, ghee, grass-fed butter are all very good options for feeding your brain.

 

Supplements –

You may need to boost your nutrients as our soils are depleted and even if your eating a healthy diet, your body may need some extra support. A good B-complex will be helpful with so many processes in the body and will also help with mood and energy. While we have less exposure to sunlight at this time of year, and because it is a main source of vitamin D, chances are that you’ll need a boost here too, but it is a good idea to have your vitamin D levels tested before adding additional vitamin D. Mushrooms and eggs are also good sources of vitamin D. Visit the Vitamin D Council for more information on testing and ideal levels of vitamin D: Click Here

 

Exercise –

Choose a type of exercise that feels right for you. It could be talking walks, yoga, Pilates, running, hiking, whatever feels enjoyable and you can commit to doing on a regular basis, the point is movement is important and will also help improve symptoms. If there is something you can choose to do outside, even better because you’ll also get that exposure to the sun even if it is a cloudy day.

 

Light Therapy –

This is an important one and acts like a supplement. Sunlight is a precursor to melatonin, which is a hormone that regulates sleep / wake cycles. Light therapy is a good way to assist with the lack of sunlight during the winter months. Its as easy as getting a light box that will run you about $30 or replacing a light bulb in a lamp. Here’s an option called a “Blues Buster” is simply a bulb that you can put in a lamp: Click Here

Talk Therapy –

Talk therapy in my opinion is important for everyone, not just those that are depressed. With all the stressors we are dealing with in today’s day and age, talk therapy is an essential. Its part of regular self-care, just like a visit to the doctor, getting a regular massage, brushing your teeth and taking a shower. Talk therapy fits into the category of self-care and it’s about time we get over the stigma associated with talk therapy. This is an essential and there is nothing wrong with talking to an objective party who will support you in your personal growth and who will also support you during tough times, whether that is depression from seasonal changes or any other stressful situation you are dealing with, a therapist is your partner in helping you work through your difficult and stressful times in life.

 

Here’s to a healthy and happy winter!

 

What Do Your Heart and Anti-Aging Have To Do With Each Other?

Let’s face it, whether you’re 20, 30, 40 or 50, you are aging, but the closer you get to the latter, the more important it is to help our bodies do what they are supposed to naturally do.

 

As we age, we may need to consider additional or different means of support depending on our individual nutritional status. In most cases we all need connective tissue support, additional immune support and other dietary supplements. Collagen is key, but it may not be the only necessary addition. In order for collagen to get into the cells and to be utilized to the fullest often additional vitamin C is necessary, usually in clinical doses.

Both of these are a good place to start in order to keep skin, hair and nails looking healthy, but what you can’t see is that it also helps muscle and connective tissue, including keeping your heart healthy. Heart health may not be what we typically think of when adding collagen to the diet, but it is an important one and the same goes for vitamin C.

 

So, you may be wondering where to start. It is important to keep in mind there are several types of collagen and the most important types for anti—aging purposes are key. There is a great post regarding how to choose the right collagen supplement for your purposes at Positive Health and Wellness. Click here to learn more.

 

Also, vitamin C is critically important in allowing Collagen to enter cells effectively. Many of us are actually chronically low with our vitamin C nutritional status, which may come as a surprise, so clinical doses may be necessary. Cardiovascular disease is actually a disease where improvement can be made with clinical doses of vitamin C. I am talking about 6 grams or above, which is tough to do orally as there can be digestive upset that comes with doses at this level.

 

I.V. therapy may actually be necessary to get nutritional levels to an optimal place for some people. The form of vitamin C that you use is also critical, at least where heart health is concerned. You want pure ascorbic acid, that is not sourced from China or derived from corn and that is not buffered or that does not include minerals, because this in turn can throw your mineral status off at clinical doses.

 

So, if you’re wondering what you can do to help yourself age gracefully, consider adding some collagen and additional vitamin C to your regimen.

 

Cheers!